Friday, January 4, 2008

No Starlet Left Behind

As a syntax geek with a stubborn sympathy for little girl lost (read: stage mother casualty) Lindsay Lohan, I don't know what to make of this instant classic... but it sure is entertaining.

5 comments:

Lisa said...

Thoughts on Lindsay Lohan's recent photoshoot in New York magazine?

Ben said...

Hearty approval mixed with a measure of continued sympathy.

Lisa said...

Hearty approval of:

1) Nudity
2) Her bold decision
3) Choice of inspiration

4) All / some combination of the above

I'll admit that I was a bit shocked. ...That it was featured in New York Magazine & not some other.

Ben said...

4, but mostly 1.

That's the id talking, of course. On the superego tip, she would do well to avoid not only nude photo shoots but clothed ones too, and try to get her life together. As with many unbalanced celebs, the continuing glare of the public eye is not helping.

I assume the non-laddishness of New York magazine is the cause of your surprise. I have not bothered to check out the photos or learn about their provenance, just saw a couple of them over a guy's shoulder at a poker game. A news report said it was a shot-for-shot recreation of the late Marilyn Monroe's final photo shoot, shot by the same photographer 40+ years later. Hence, New York magazine and not Stuff.

Incidentally, Lindsay seems old before her time, and more so with every turn. She's only 21 but could pass for a hard-living 36.

Lisa said...

You realize that if we're ever asked how we met, we can truthfully answer, "On the internet, discussing Lindsay Lohan's nude photoshoot." Yes?

> That's the id talking, of course. On the superego tip, she would
> do well to avoid not only nude photo shoots but clothed ones too, and

Shortly after I received my copy of New York Magazine in the mail, my copy of Harper's Bazaar arrived with Miss Lohan on the cover looking every bit the pretty, glamourous & healthy starlet full of vitality. Well... She's versatile?

> try to get her life together. As with many unbalanced celebs, the
> continuing glare of the public eye is not helping.

At least she doesn't have children. Hello, Britney!

> I assume the non-laddishness of New York magazine is the cause of
> your surprise.

Yes. Seems more like Playboy material.

> I have not bothered to check out the photos or learn
> about their provenance, just saw a couple of them over a guy's
> shoulder at a poker game.

??? I'm trying to figure out the logistics of this scene...

If you're at the poker table, how are you looking over another guy's shoulder?
If he's at the poker table, shouldn't he have cards in his hands?

> A news report said it was a shot-for-shot
> recreation of the late Marilyn Monroe's final photo shoot, shot by the
> same photographer 40+ years later. Hence, New York magazine and not
> Stuff.

Stick a PDA in her hands & an earpiece on her head -- Stuff Magazine, here we come. Problem solved!

I saw the photos (Didn't read the article), & knowing the recreation angle, had to think: Lindsay, are you trying to tell us something? Foreshadow, much?

> Incidentally, Lindsay seems old before her time, and more so with
> every turn. She's only 21 but could pass for a hard-living 36.

I miss being 21. Do over, please. (But with the knowledge I've acquired, of course.)

Welcome to the new world:

Never Too Young for That First Pedicure
By CAMILLE SWEENEY

ONE recent rainy afternoon, Eleanor LaFauci, 7, sat with her feet in open-toed foam slippers, admiring her toenails, freshly painted watermelon pink.

"Look, we're reading an adult magazine," Eleanor told her mother, gleefully waving a copy of People with a desultory-looking Britney Spears on its cover.

Eleanor was in the bubble-gum-colored pedicure lounge of Dashing Diva, the Upper West Side franchise of the international nail spa, with her 3 -year-old sister and a half-dozen or so friends. The girls were celebrating her birthday with mani's, pedi's and mini-makeovers with light makeup and body art -- glitter-applied stars, lightning bolts and, of course, hearts.

Eleanor's mother, Anne O'Brien, stood watching and shrugged. "What can I say?" said Ms. O'Brien, whose husband suggested the party. "She's a girly girl. I'm not quite sure how it happened. I didn't get my first manicure until I was 25."

Traditionally, young girls have played with unattended M.A.C. eye shadow or Chanel foundation, hoping to capture a whiff of sophistication. In the recent past, young girls have also tagged along on beauty expeditions by their mothers and teenage sisters.

But today, cosmetic companies and retailers increasingly aim their sophisticated products and service packages squarely at 6- to 9-year-olds, who are being transformed into savvy beauty consumers before they're out of elementary school...

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/28/fashion/28Skin.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin